Career Development of Outdoor Students in Higher Education: Comparing Methodologies

Authors

  • Anja Whittington Radford University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18666/JOREL-2018-V10-I3-9044

Keywords:

outdoor recreation, career development, higher education

Abstract

Students studying outdoor recreation in higher education settings often have two avenues to obtain their degree. One avenue includes traditional classroom instruction in which students gain skills and study theory and content over several semesters, and the other includes an intensive field-based course that uses experiential learning as its focal point (Carver, 1996; Lindsay & Ewert, 1999). This study examined whether the different avenues yielded different student outcomes, skill development, and career development.

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References

Carver, R. (1996). Theory for practice: A framework for thinking about experiential education. Journal of Experiential Education, 19(1), 8-13. https://doi.org/10.1177/105382599601900102

Lindsay, A., & Ewert, A. (1999). Learning at the edge: Can experiential education contribute to educational reform? Journal of Experiential Education, 22(1), 12-19. https://doi.org/10.1177/105382599902200103

Wagstaff, M. (2016). Outdoor leader career development: Exploration of a career path. Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education and Leadership, 8(1), 75-95. http://dx.doi.org/10.18666/JOREL-2016-V1-I1-7284

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Published

2018-08-15

Issue

Section

AORE Research Symposium Abstracts