Spinal Cord Injury, Adaptive Alpine Skiing, and the Description of Quality of Life

Authors

  • Benjamin Hulin Salt Lake Community College
  • Rehema Underwood Grand Canyon University
  • Melissa L. Zahl University of Utah

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore how individuals with spinal cord injury who participate in adaptive alpine skiing describe autonomy, competence, and relatedness as they relate to quality of life in the United States. This qualitative study can help readers understand how participation in adaptive alpine skiing may contribute to the satisfaction of autonomy, competence, and relatedness as it relates to quality of life. Self-determination theory framed three research questions: The sample included 24 individuals with spinal cord injury ages 18-65 who participate in adaptive alpine skiing in the United States. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews and two focus groups. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis that used an inductive coding approach. Five themes were found that contribute to quality of life: Independence and adaptive skiing, confidence and adaptive skiing, learning a new skill in adaptive skiing, sense of accomplishment in adaptive skiing, and connection with others after spinal cord injury. This study advanced the understanding of the satisfaction of psychological needs and quality of life for individuals with spinal cord injury who participate in adaptive alpine skiing.

Published

2024-05-20

Issue

Section

Feature Articles