Sector Distinctiveness v. Cross-Sector Commonalities: Are There Qualitative Differences in Graduate Nonprofit Management Education Offered Through Public Service and Business Programs in the United Kingdom?

Authors

  • Michael A. Taylor Seton Hall University
  • Terence K. Teo Seton Hall University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18666/JNEL-2021-11386

Abstract

Previous research on nonprofit management education (NME) in the United Kingdom (UK) has raised the question of whether NME provided through public service departments will focus more on third sector distinctiveness, while NME provided through business schools will concentrate more on general, cross-sector management skills. We collect data on courses offered within UK graduate degree programs with an NME concentration and compare them using Mirabella’s (2007) taxonomy and find that there is more commonality than differences between graduate NME offered in both business and public service programs in the UK. However, statistically significant differences in the provision of courses as a proportion of total curriculum do exist for courses related to “advocacy, public policy, and community organizing,” “financial management,” and “social enterprise.”

Author Biographies

Michael A. Taylor, Seton Hall University

Associate Professor, Department of Political Science & Public Affairs Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, USA

Terence K. Teo, Seton Hall University

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science & Public Affairs Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, USA

Published

2022-01-14

Issue

Section

Articles