Analyzing Research Patterns in Outdoor and Adventure-Based Expressions of Experiential Education Over Time

Authors

  • Julie A. Carlson Minnesota State University, Mankato
  • Laura Bermúdez-Jurado Minnesota State University, Mankato
  • Mariam Qureshi Minnesota State University, Mankato
  • Andrea Shearer Ippen Minnesota State University, Mankato.
  • Michael Hollibush Minnesota State University, Mankato.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18666/JOREL-2019-V11-I2-9060

Keywords:

outdoor education, adventure education, experiential education

Abstract

The purpose of this analytical study was to identify patterns in primary, empirical research data collection methods published in five experiential education refereed journals over time (essentially from 1978 to 2017). A total of 815 research reports were examined among five prominent refereed journals, in the arena of outdoor and adventure-based approaches to experiential education. Data collected included general research methods used, data collection procedures, study locations, and sample sizes. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, and crosstabulations were used to determine tendencies in these four data stratifications. Because of varying foci of the sample journals, data were collectively tabulated and reported to show patterns in experiential education primary research over time.

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Author Biographies

Julie A. Carlson, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Dr. Julie A. Carlson is a professor with the Master of Science in Experiential Education program in the Dept. of Educational Leadership at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Laura Bermúdez-Jurado, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Laura Bermúdez-Jurado, M.S., is a graduate assistant in the Master's in Experiential Education program at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Mariam Qureshi, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Mariam Qureshi, EdD, is an alumnus from the Doctorate in Educational Leadership program at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Andrea Shearer Ippen, Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Andrea Ippen, PhD, is a graduate from, and former graduate assistant with, the Master's in Experiential Education program at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Michael Hollibush, Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Michael Hollibush, M.S., is an alumnus from the Master's in Experiential Education program at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

References

References

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Published

2019-04-30

Issue

Section

Research Note