Effects of Requiring Physical Fitness in a Lecture-Based College Course: Students’ Attitudes Toward Physical Activity

Authors

  • Keri A. Esslinger Western Kentucky University
  • Amanda R. Grimes University of Missouri - Kansas City
  • Elizabeth Pyle Western Kentucky University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18666/TPE-2016-V73-I1-5100

Keywords:

Attitude toward physical activity, required physical activity,

Abstract

In this study, we investigated students’ attitudes toward physical activity (PA) when including a required PA component in a university-required personal wellness class. The study included (a) an experimental group of students enrolled in a personal wellness course in which there was a required PA requirement and (b) a control group of students enrolled in a personal wellness course in which there was no PA requirement. Subjects were tested using the Corbin Attitude Test. The students in the experimental group were exposed to an additional PA requirement in which they were to exercise at least twice per week at a perceived exertion level of 4 or above on the modified 1 to 10 scale. Students in the control group were only required to complete the university-required personal wellness course, which did not include a required PA component. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine if adding the PA component had an effect on students’ attitudes and perceptions toward their personal health and to check for significance between gender and attitude toward physical activity. The analysis of the data showed no significant gain or decline in attitude for either group, suggesting that although specific required PA does not significantly improve attitude, it does not hurt it either. It could be surmised from this study and similar studies that choice of activity is the most important factor for improving attitude toward PA.

Author Biographies

Keri A. Esslinger, Western Kentucky University

Dr. Keri Esslinger is currently an Assistant Professor of Physical Education Teacher Education in the Dept. of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport at Western Kentucky University.

Amanda R. Grimes, University of Missouri - Kansas City

Dr. Amanda Grimes is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Bachelor of Health Sciences degree program at UMKC. Additionally, Amanda carries the credentials of the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES).

Elizabeth Pyle, Western Kentucky University

Dr. Elizabeth Pyle is currently an Assistant Professor of Physical Education Teacher Education in the Dept. of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport at Western Kentucky University.

Published

2016-01-25

Issue

Section

Articles