Effects of Teacher-to-Student Relatedness on Adolescent Male Motivation in a Weight Training Class

Authors

  • Zack Beddoes University of Texas
  • Keven Prusak Keven Prusak, PhD is a professor at Brigham Young University and a coauthor on this manuscript.
  • David Barney David Barney, PhD is an associate professor at BYU and a coauthor on this paper
  • Carol Wilkinson Carol Wilkinson, PhD is an associate professor at BYU and a coauthor on this paper.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18666/TPE-2016-V73-I3-6321

Keywords:

self-determination, physical education, junior high boys, middle school

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if the motivational profiles of male junior high weight training students differ across levels of teacher-to-student relatedness. One hundred and sixty six students participated in one of two units of instruction. Contextual motivation was measured using the Sport Motivation Scale II–Physical Education (SMS II–PE). Situational motivation and relatedness measurements were assessed using the Situational Motivation Scale-Physical Education (SIMS–PE), Amotivation Inventory–Physical Education Scale (AI–PE), and the Interpersonal Behavior Scale (IBS). Results revealed that situational motivation was not affected by the intervention in either group. Significant differences were observed in students’ contextual motivation. That is, both within-groups’ contextual motivation increased. Though the intervention did not reveal significant differences in students’ situational motivation, it may confirm the complimentary nature of relatedness and autonomy constructs in fostering student self-determination in a physical education setting.

Author Biographies

Zack Beddoes, University of Texas

Zack Beddoes is a PhD student in the Department of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, Physical Education Teacher Eduaction at The University of Texas at Austin.

Keven Prusak, Keven Prusak, PhD is a professor at Brigham Young University and a coauthor on this manuscript.

Keven Prusak, PhD is an associate professor at Brigham Young University in the Department of Teacher Education.

David Barney, David Barney, PhD is an associate professor at BYU and a coauthor on this paper

David Barney, EdD is an associate professor at BYU in the Department of Teacher Education.

Carol Wilkinson, Carol Wilkinson, PhD is an associate professor at BYU and a coauthor on this paper.

Carol Wilkinson, PhD is an associate professor at BYU in the Department of Teacher Education

Published

2016-10-12

Issue

Section

Articles